Posts filed under ‘The New York Botanical Garden’

Cougar Mountain – A Lesson in Action

When Ryan and I were at The New York Botantical Gardens I ran across a sign about the fern lifecycle.  It taught me how first fern spores make a Heart in Nature gametophyte that has both egg and sperm.  Only when an egg and sperm combine, do you get a new fern.


Fern Lifecycle (Source East Stroudsburg University)

Exactly two weeks and roughly 3000 miles later, Ryan and I saw part of fern reproduction in action while hiking Washington state’s Cougar Mountain:

Cougar Mountain - De Leo Wall Trail - Fern Spores (Close)
Fern Spores on the De Leo Wall Trail

We learned a lesson on one coast and saw it in action on the other!

More pictures of Cougar Mountain can be found on my Flickr site. For more detailed trail descriptions of Cougar Mountain hikes, I highly recommend the Weekend Hike blog.

June 2, 2011 at 1:00 am 2 comments

The New York Botanical Garden – Blooms

Ryan and I visited The New York Botanical Gardens at a great time. We got to see a whole lot of blooms and subsequently got a whole lot of pictures. To keep it short and sweet, here’s a mosaic from Big Huge Lab’s Mosaic Maker. Enjoy!

The New York Botanical Garden - Mosiac of Blooms

1. Cherry Blooms, 2. Yellow Tulip, 3. White Star Flowers, 4. Pink Crabapple Blooms, 5. Wild Daffodils in Daffodil Valley, 6. Jade Vine (Strongylodon macrobotrys) Blooms, 7. Spotted Pink and Purple Blooms, 8. Snowdrift Crabapple Blooms, 9. Pieris, 10. Passion Flower (Passifolor x kewensis), 11. Spikes and Flowers in the African Desert Room, 12. Pink Pinecone (Close)

Thirsty for more New York City spring blooms? Check out Spring Blooms in Washington Square by localecologist.

May 25, 2011 at 1:00 am 2 comments

The New York Botanical Garden – Nature Taking Over

When you are inside the Conservatory at The New York Botanical Garden, you know that the environment you are taking in was architected by humans. Still, you get to catch glimpses of what nature wants to do if left to its own devices– take over. : )

New York Botanical Gardens - Vines Climb Pillar (Far)
Vines Climb Up a Pillar in the Conservatory

New York Botanical Gardens - Determined Vine on Stairwell
This Determined Vine is Squeezing Itself Into a Home in the Stairwell Handrail

More pictures of The New York Botanical Gardens can be found on my Flickr site.

May 24, 2011 at 1:00 am 2 comments

The New York Botanical Garden – Textures in Palms

During our visit to the New York Botanical Gardens, I was quite enamoured with the variety of textures one can see just in palm tree trunks. There are about 2600 different species of palms– some species live in rain forests. Others live in deserts. With that kind of range, obviously they have to be pretty diverse… and one can spy souvenirs of that diversity even if you look no further than the trunks.

New York Botanical Gardens - Pattern in Palm Bark
Bumpy Palm Trunk

New York Botanical Gardens - Pattern in Palm Bark 2
Burlap-y Palm Trunk

New York Botanical Gardens - Pattern in Traveller's Tree (Ravenela madagascariensis)
Patterns in Traveller’s Tree (Ravenela madagascariensis) Trunk

New York Botanical Gardens - Textures in African Desert Room
Trunk in African Desert Room

New York Botanical Gardens - Textures - Fuzzy Bark and Palm Leaves
Fuzzy Trunk

More pictures of The New York Botanical Gardens can be found on my Flickr site.

May 23, 2011 at 1:00 am 3 comments

The New York Botanical Garden – Hearts in Nature

A Heart in Nature post seems to be a fitting followup to a reminiscent wedding post! Ryan and I spotted a few hearts in nature in the Conservatory of The New York Botanical Garden. Enjoy!

New York Botanical Gardens - Heart in Nature - Thai Red Papaya (Carica papaya)
Thai Red Papaya (Carica papaya)

New York Botanical Gardens - Heart in Nature - Leaf in Tropical Conversancy
Leaf in Tropical Section of the Conservatory

New York Botanical Gardens - Heart in Nature - Anthurium crystallinum
Anthurium crystallinum

May 20, 2011 at 1:00 am 2 comments

The New York Botanical Garden and The Royal Wedding

The day Ryan and I went to The New York Botanical Garden was April 29th, which also happened to be the date of the Royal Wedding. Ryan and I didn’t watch the nuptials, but en route to the gardens on the Subway, Ryan perused Facebook on his phone.

“Oh boy,” he said, “Everyone is remembering their own weddings today.”

I thought I would be pretty insulated from such nostalgia in the gardens. However, as soon as I entered the American Desert section on the Conservatory, I was greeted by some familiar faces.

New York Botanical Gardens - Succulents 1
Succulents!!!

New York Botanical Gardens - Succulents 2
More Succulents!!!

Naturally, I thought about our centerpieces. I thought about our bouquets. I smiled and just like everyone else– I remembered my own wedding on April 29th. : )

P.S. We still have bouquet and centerpiece succulents growing!

May 19, 2011 at 1:00 am 3 comments

The New York Botanical Garden – Overview

After weeks of heavy work, Ryan and I took a couple of days off and had a long weekend in New York City. Friday, April 29th, we visited The New York Botanical Garden which was impressive and huge. The New York Botanical Garden is sort of like the Ground Zero of the Chestnut blight. The blight was first discovered in chestnuts growing in the adjacent Bronx Zoo. It was a mycologist from The New York Botantical Gardens, William Murrill, who uncovered the cause.

One of my favorite parts of the gardens is the large section of native forest they have preserved. In the Appalachians, the chestnuts are ever hopeful. When the blight kills the tree’s trunk, the roots send off a new shoot and tries again. Having seen so many examples in the Appalachians, I fully expected to see some baby chestnuts in the native forest section, still giving it another go a century later. Alas, I didn’t see any.

That doesn’t mean I left the park disappointed! There was so much to see and absorb. We were there at a good time to see a lot of blooms – cherries, daffodils, tulips, crabapples. And I learned a number of new trees, especially maples.

Some shots from the day:

New York Botanical Gardens - Austrian black pine (Pinus nigra ssp. nigra)
I loved the bark of this Austrian Black Pine (Pinus nigra ssp. nigra)

New York Botanical Gardens - Caucasian wingnut (Pterocarya fraxinifolia) Bark and Leaves
Caucasian wingnut (Pterocarya fraxinifolia) – Ryan calls this one “The Rush Limbaugh Tree” : )

New York Botanical Gardens - Conservancy
The Conservatory

New York Botanical Gardens - Dead and Alive Version of Leaf
I liked how you could see what this dead leaf was supposed to look like.

New York Botanical Gardens - Norway maple (Acer platanoides) Leaf
One of the new maples I was introduced to – Norway maple (Acer platanoides)

New York Botanical Gardens - Pink Pinecone (Far)
I loved this flower because it looked like a big pink pinecone.

New York Botanical Gardens - Silhouettes On Orange Gyro (Heliconia latispatha) Leaf
Silhouettes on Orange Gyro (Heliconia latispatha) Leaf

I have some more posts on the gardens to come. In the meantime, more pictures of our visit to The New York Botanical Garden can be found on my Flickr site.

May 18, 2011 at 1:00 am 3 comments


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