Busy Beavers

April 4, 2008 at 12:33 am 6 comments

On Wednesday evening, I did some more exploring with Sean and the dogs. This time we checked out an unamed Foot Traffic Road off of VA-460 between Pandapas Pond and VA-708.


The hardest part of this outing was trying to not block this gate and still avoid busy 460.

Our journey started on an old gravel road.  Just when I thought there would be nothing out of the ordinary about this trek, we came to a large clearing.


Field off of the foot traffic road

We explored the field a bit, then ventured into the woods and surprise! We found overselves on the Poverty Creek Trail again! (On a different section this time)


Surprise reunion with Poverty Creek

Here is where the most fascinating part of the trip occurred. This section of the creek was occupied by beavers. I’ve always heard the phrase “busy as a beaver”, but I never thought too much about it. I liked the saying because of the alliteration; I never speculated on the accuracy.

But looking at the extent of the work at Poverty Creek, I can declare that statement is dead-on. The amount of downed trees in the area was astounding. And some of the trees they took on were rather large. Not sequoia large, mind you, but large enough for me to realize beavers have ambition that rivals most Olympic athletes.

It was hard for me to get a picture that truly captured how many trees the beavers took down, so I settled for a number of shots showing just a very small fraction of their handiwork.


Just one of the beavers’ dams. I think we saw at least four.


Beaver chewed tree


D’oh. After all that dedicated chewing, this tree got stuck


Partially chewed tree on the left, water ripples on the right


There are at least FIVE trees the beavers downed in this shot

The outing was only about an hour, but it was enough to get some fresh air, some exercise…and obtain some healthy admiration for the work ethic of beavers.

More pictures of this Poverty Creek outing can be found on my Flickr site.

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Entry filed under: beaver, Hiking, Poverty Creek. Tags: .

Do I Drop Things More Than Most People? links for 2008-04-04

6 Comments Add your own

  • 1. geekhiker  |  April 4, 2008 at 1:05 am

    It’s when you’re not looking that they pull out the tiny little chainsaws…

    Sorry, been watching “Ax Men” on the History Channel all week, guess it’s stuck in my head…

    Reply
  • 2. Vicky  |  April 4, 2008 at 7:18 am

    @geekhiker – I’ve been enjoying Ax Men so far. So many of the shots are so insane, my mind keeps thinking it has to be CGI. When they were dragging one of those trees up the mountain via the skyline, I had to watch it a couple of times to realize it was NOT fake.

    The All New Deadliest Catch starts again this month!!! I got to see a preview for that Discovery Channel show at the movie theatre. It is amazing on the big screen. I bet it would be briilliant on IMAX (and I bet it would make people ill)

    Reply
  • 3. Clint  |  April 4, 2008 at 9:45 am

    i thought that gate looked familiar…!

    Reply
  • 4. pneumoniaBoy  |  April 4, 2008 at 10:12 am

    There is a small stretch of I-75 in Northwest Georgia where beavers set up shop on either side of the Interstate. The state has provided permits for hunters to kill the beavers on occasion and dynamite their dams because so much water backs up it endangers the shoulders of the road. So in between the every 4-5 years (or however long it is in between hunting) you can see these little buggers just going at it sawing down trees. It’s amazing to see them reduce a tree to toothpicks!

    Reply
  • 5. gaugeyagee  |  April 4, 2008 at 11:39 am

    Beavers – Nature’s terrorists.

    Reply
  • 6. Katie  |  April 13, 2008 at 6:05 am

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen evidence of beaver activity before – they certainly do a nice job of felling trees.

    Reply

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